2018 Newsletters

January 2018

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.

www.osler.org

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your examination. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

Finish your 2017 QPP checklist before ringing in the new year
The year is not over yet. So that means there is still time to take action to avoid Medicare payment penalties, prepare for a strong 2018, and maybe even do some shopping.

Studies Indicate Board Certified Physicians Less Likely to Face Disciplinary Actions
In response to a recent Sun-Sentinel feature on “dangerous doctors,” the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), a leading organization that oversees physician Board Certification in the United States, is sharing data to reassure Floridians about their Board Certified physicians.

Creating electric fields in the brain buys glioblastoma patients extra months of lifeCreating electric fields in the brain buys glioblastoma patients extra months of life
An unusual cancer treatment that creates electric fields in the brain via a bathing-cap-like device can buy a few more months of life for patients with glioblastoma, the aggressive brain cancer that is essentially always fatal, physicians reported on Tuesday in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association.

First Gene Therapy For Inherited Disease Gets FDA Approval
The Food and Drug Administration Tuesday approved the first gene therapy to treat an inherited disease

Clinicians still struggle to quickly access EHRs at point of care
Computers and workstations on wheels (WoWs) were designed to help clinicians spend less time working from nursing-station desktops and more time at the point of care. The reality, however, is that the ideal has yet to be fully realized. All too often care team workflows remain fragmented because of the need to access patient data and clinical information from multiple disparate systems.

Inspector general report: FDA food recalls dangerously slow, procedures deeply flawed
The federal recall process for about 80% of the nation’s food is so slow it can take up to 10 months to get unsafe products off all store shelves — even when people are getting sick, says a report released Tuesday by the Department of Health and Human Services’ inspector general office.

Excessive Video Gaming to be Named Mental Disorder by WHO
The World Health Organization is adding an unexpected disorder to its list of mental health conditions in 2018. Next year, people who play an excessive amount of video games could find themselves diagnosed with “gaming disorder.”

The data are in, but debate rages: Are hospital readmission penalties a good idea?
A closely watched experiment in health care has unfolded over the last few years: Financial incentives for hospitals to reduce readmissions. It was a feature of the Affordable Care Act, and researchers are now assessing its impacts. But even as data have arrived, an impassioned argument has broken out among experts — looking at the same numbers, they have reached different conclusions about whether the policy is making Americans healthier.

Vigorous Exercise May Help Slow Parkinson’s Disease
People with early stage Parkinson’s may be able to delay a worsening of the disease through a regimen of intense exercise, new research found.

‘Ground-breaking’ new drug gives hope in Huntington’s disease
Scientists have for the first time fixed a protein defect that causes Huntington’s disease by injecting a drug from Ionis Pharmaceuticals into the spine, offering new hope for patients with the devastating genetic disease.

Scientists use CRISPR to turn genes on without editing their DNA 
The revolutionary gene editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 is best known for helping scientists edit a strand of DNA more precisely and efficiently than ever before.

Nothing Protects Black Women From Dying in Pregnancy and Childbirth
On a melancholy Saturday this past February, Shalon Irving’s “village” — the friends and family she had assembled to support her as a single mother — gathered at a funeral home in a prosperous black neighborhood in southwest Atlanta to say goodbye and send her home. The afternoon light was gray but bright, flooding through tall arched windows and pouring past white columns, illuminating the flag that covered her casket. Sprays of callas and roses dotted the room like giant corsages, flanking photos from happier times: Shalon in a slinky maternity dress, sprawled across her couch with her puppy; Shalon, sleepy-eyed and cradling the tiny head of her newborn daughter, Soleil. In one portrait Shalon wore a vibrant smile and the crisp uniform of the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service, where she had been a lieutenant commander. Many of the mourners were similarly attired. Shalon’s father, Samuel, surveyed the rows of somber faces from the lectern. “I’ve never been in a room with so many doctors,” he marveled. “… I’ve never seen so many Ph.D.s.”


San Diego continues hepatitis emergency with watchful eye to the Midwest
Mindful of a concerning development in the Midwest, county supervisors decided Tuesday to continue calling San Diego’s hepatitis A outbreak a public health emergency even though the level of intensity has been falling for weeks.

Doctor out sick? A substitute physician is no worse for patients’ health
It’s long been thought that hospitalized patients are better off getting treatment from full-time doctors instead of temp physicians. Those temps are called in to cover for doctors’ sick days, vacation, or staff vacancies. But new research finds that a doctor’s employment status may have little to do with quality of care.

This Is Why Millennials Are Struggling to Get Health Insurance
Marguerite Moniot felt frustrated and flummoxed, despite the many hours she spent in front of the computer this year reading consumer reviews of health insurance plans offered on the individual market in Virginia. Moniot was preparing to buy a policy of her own, knowing she would age out of her parent’s plan when she turned 26 in October.

Pollution Could Cancel Out the Health Benefits of Walking, a New Study Says
Simple though it may be, walking is one of the best things you can do for your body. Research has shown that it can extend your life and improve your heart health, along with a host of other health metrics.

Weight Loss Really Can Reverse Diabetes, New Study Finds
Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition that affects 422 million people worldwide. For decades, doctors have treated it with medications designed to keep blood sugar levels down.

Out-of-pocket health spending in 2016 increased at the fastest rate in a decade
U.S. health care spending increased to $3.3 trillion in 2016, with out-of-pocket health care costs borne directly by consumers rising 3.9 percent — the fastest rate of growth since 2007.

Gene therapy makes a big advance treating hemophilia B blood disorder
Jay Konduros used to rush home several times a year after accidentally cutting or bumping himself. There he would inject himself with refrigerated blood-clotting factor to prevent internal bleeding and extensive bruising and swelling. “I was walking on eggshells all the time,” said the former aerospace engineer who has a blood disorder called hemophilia B.

FDA APPROVES INJECTABLE OPIOID TO HELP FIGHT AMERICA’S DRUG CRISIS
In an effort to fight America’s opioid crisis, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new form of a drug that helps patients ease their withdrawal symptoms.

FDA Approves Trastuzumab Biosimilar Includes HER2-positive breast, stomach cancer
The FDA granted a first-ever approval on Friday for a biosimilar for the HER2 receptor inhibitor trastuzumab (Herceptin).

FDA approves first-of-a-kind test for cancer gene profiling
U.S. regulators have approved a first-of-a-kind test that looks for mutations in hundreds of cancer genes at once, giving a more complete picture of what’s driving a patient’s tumor and aiding efforts to match treatments to those flaws.

 

www.osler.org

February 2018

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.

www.osler.org

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your examination. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

Evolution of Continuing Medical Education Promoting Innovation Through Regulatory Alignment
Physicians thrive personally and provide better care when they are working in a supportive environment.1 There is a need to create a system in which physicians find effective and efficient education that not only augments their ability to deliver optimal care, but also provides intellectual stimulation and fosters personal growth. Top-down mandates for education are not only typically ineffective, but create cynicism that erodes clinicians’ trust and engagement in their continuing medical education (CME).

Most states don’t require that kids be checked for health issues 
(Reuters Health) – – Most U.S. states don’t require that children be screened for health conditions that can affect learning, according to new research supported by the Children’s Health Fund (CHF). “There are many children, especially in low income communities, that are not succeeding academically because they have health conditions that are known to interfere with learning, but nobody is screening for them or treating them,” Dr. Irwin Redlener, Co-Founder of Children’s Health Fund and Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, told Reuters Health in a telephone interview. “That is something that has to be fixed.”

Fed Up With Drug Companies, Hospitals Decide to Start Their Own
For years, hospital executives have expressed frustration when essential drugs like heart medicines have become scarce, or when prices have skyrocketed because investors manipulated the market.

Scientists seek super-shot for flu 100 years after pandemic
Some victims felt fine in the morning and were dead by night. Faces turned blue as patients coughed up blood. Stacked bodies outnumbered coffins.

FDA to speed review of medical products for use by military
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Department of Defense launched a program on Tuesday to speed the development and review of medical products needed by the military, such as freeze-dried plasma that could prevent wounded troops from bleeding to death.

California hospitals face a ‘war zone’ of flu patients — and are setting up tents to treat them
Ana Oktay rushed to the hospital in late December struggling to breathe, with a 102-degree fever and a cough that wouldn’t let up.

Lactation May Lower T2D Risk in Younger Women
Longer duration of breastfeeding was associated with a lower risk of diabetes among mothers later in life, according to a 30-year observational study.

Paying it forward: Physicians create, support 12.6M jobs, contribute to health of the economy
Physicians don’t just improve the health of their patients, they also help keep the economy healthy, according to a report out this morning from the American Medical Association.

Coming Soon: A Once-Weekly Pill to Fight HIV?
Researchers say a once-a-week, slow-release pill may keep HIV infections under control and help prevent new HIV infections altogether.

Faced with public pressure, research institutions step up reporting of clinical trial results
The reporting of clinical trial results to a public database — mandated by a 10-year-old federal law — has improved sharply in the last two years, with universities and other nonprofit research centers leading the way, according to a new STAT analysis of government data.

Bariatric Surgery Helps Teens With Severe Obesity Reduce Heart Disease Risk
After three years, teens with severe obesity who underwent stomach reduction surgery to lose weight also significantly improved their heart health.

Plans to Slash Medical Costs in America Run Into Generic Drug Concerns
As U.S. regulators push hundreds of new generic drugs to market in an effort to drive down prices, the industry is facing a continuing problem in India, where many copycat medicines are manufactured.

CMS unveils new portal for MACRA reporting
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has launched a new website to help physicians and eligible clinicians taking part in the Quality Payment Program more easily submit 2017 performance data.

Price tag on gene therapy for rare form of blindness: $850K
A first-of-its kind genetic treatment for blindness will cost $850,000 per patient, making it one of the most expensive medicines in the world and raising questions about the affordability of a coming wave of similar gene-targeting therapies.

New cancer treatments have perplexing side effects
When Diane Legg began seeing black specks in her right eye, she went to an ophthalmologist near her home in Amesbury, Mass. He said she had a torn retina and needed laser surgery. 

Studies Question Current Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines
Lung cancer screening based on an individual’s risk could save more lives than screening as recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), according to a study from the National Cancer Institute.

Don’t Panic: Domestic Flyers Won’t Be Turned Away for Old Driver’s Licenses
DHS confirms that while some states have yet to be granted extensions to adopt the standardized identification requirements of the REAL ID program, no travel disruption is anticipated.

The uninsured are overusing emergency rooms — and other health-care myths
In the search for ways to bring down American health-care spending, there are certain ideas that are close to dogma. Chief among them: If you provide health insurance to people, they will stop overusing the emergency room.

Modifiable Risk Factors May Underpin Racial T2D Disparity
Modifiable risk factors in young adulthood may explain the higher incidence of type 2 diabetes among black Americans, a new study found.

Memorial Hermann doctors help adapt battlefield medical device to save trauma patients
Ejected from his motorcycle after his tires hit a patch of oil, Michael Cassidy landed on a fire hydrant with such force doctors described it as splitting him up the middle.

Prevalence of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Surgeons and Interventionalists
What is the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among at-risk physicians (surgeons and interventionalists)?

Old age not necessarily a risk factor for surgical complications
Older adults may not necessarily be at risk for surgery complications just because of their age, but their risk for serious complications may be at least doubled if they’re frail or suffering from dementia, a research review suggests.

www.osler.org

March 2018

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‘Broken’ medical liability system is costly to doctors, healthcare system, says AMA The AMA says the high number of malpractice lawsuits is costly to the healthcare system. (Getty/AlexStar) For doctors, it’s a question of when—not if—they will face a medical liability lawsuit. And that probability is costly to the healthcare system, according to the American Medical Association, which yesterday released a new series of reports that demonstrate the price Americans pay for what it called the “broken” medical liability system.


Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, JPMorgan Chase to tackle employee health care costs, delivery This file photo taken on September 12, 2016 shows Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase, during an interview with David M. Rubenstein, President of the Economic Club of Washington, in Washington, DC. The odds of a breakup of the European Union have increased after Brexit, an outcome that could have “devastating” economic and political effects, JPMorgan Chase’s chief executive said on April 4, 2017. JPMorgan chief executive Jamie Dimon, in an annual letter to shareholders, said he had hoped Britain’s decision last year to exit the EU would have led the bloc to focus on “fixing its issues,” such as immigration and rigid labor rules.

Why Geisinger’s “Fresh Food Farmacy” Initiative Could Turn Out To Be a Nationally Replicable Model It was so encouraging to read Associate Editor Heather Landi’s report on an exciting initiative at the Danville, Pennsylvania-based Geisinger Health System. As she noted in her report, under the headline, “Can a Prescription for Fresh Food Treat Diabetes? At Geisinger, an Informatics-Driven Project Is Showing Promising Results,” she noted that, “With the aim of addressing food insecurity, as a significant social factor impacting health, and to improve patients’ diabetes management, Geisinger launched an IT- and data analytics-driven Fresh Food Farmacy initiative to give away fresh, healthy food to diabetes patients. The health system initially launched the program in July 2016 as a pilot project at Geisinger Shamokin Area Community Hospital in Coal Township, in Northumberland County, which has the second-highest rate of long-term diabetes complications in central Pennsylvania.”

Schools push lifestyle medicine to boost chronic-disease prevention For all that medical students, residents and physicians learn or know about advances in pharmaceuticals, diagnostics and precision medicine that can improve patient outcomes, it is what happens in patients’ lives where they live, work and play that too often gets passed over—across the medical educational continuum. That is the case even though lifestyle choices can have the biggest impact on prevention and management of chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes.

FDA Clears Trevo Stent Retriever for Up to 24 Hours Post-Stroke The stent retriever from Stryker was cleared for thrombectomy-eligible patients as initial therapy to reduce paralysis and other stroke disability only as an addition to tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Previously, the device was approved only for use within 6 hours of ischemic stroke onset.

Fecal transplants move into the mainstream to treat difficult infection Fecal transplants are increasingly becoming a mainstream treatment. For the first time, an influential medical group is recommending the procedure — in which donor fecal matter is transferred to a patient — for individuals who have repeatedly failed standard treatments for severe diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile, commonly known as C. diff1.

Why Medical Students Hate Fox’s New TV Show The Resident As graduating medical students eager to begin our residency training this summer, we were intrigued to hear that Fox would be depicting this crucial phase of our medical training in its new show, The Resident. After watching the pilot episode, we were appalled and horrified.

Physicians, ethicists urge Congress not to pass ‘right-to-try’ legislation WASHINGTON — Dozens of doctors, medical ethicists, and lawyers are warning Congress that legislation to allow Americans with life-threatening conditions access to unapproved, experimental drugs risks harming patients’ health.

ACP calls on doctors to practice what they teach The formal curriculum of medical education must be reinforced and enhanced by the hidden curriculum conveyed in medical schools, residency programs, hospitals, clinics, and team rooms, the American College of Physicians (ACP) recommends in a new position paper published today in Annals of Internal Medicine.

How can we remedy the shortage of health providers? In a medical mecca like Boston, which is home to three medical schools and many world-class hospitals, you’d think that getting a timely appointment with a primary care physician or specialist would be a breeze. It isn’t. Finding a doctor is even harder in rural and underserved areas. Yet the public debate on health care remains focused on insurance and funding, and largely ignores the undersupply of health care professionals. Access to care means more than adequate insurance.
 
 


The Osler Institute Terre Haute IN 47807 (800) 356-7537

April 2018

 The Osler Institute

Welcome Dr. [last name]

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.

www.osler.org

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your examination. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

Professionalism: Momentum for MOC Changes
National specialty medical societies, including the AAN, have joined forces with state medical societies to demand significant changes to the long-controversial processes by which physicians maintain their board certifications. Current maintenance of certification (MOC) programs have become so unpopular that state legislatures are moving to limit the significance of MOC and some physicians are opting out of the predominant recertification system entirely.

Health Care Spending in the United States and Other High-Income Countries
In 2016, the United States spent nearly twice as much as 10 high-income countries on medical care and performed less well on many population health outcomes. Contrary to some explanations for high spending, social spending and health care utilization in the United States did not differ substantially from other high-income nations. Prices of labor and goods, including pharmaceuticals and devices, and administrative costs appeared to be the main drivers of the differences in spending.

Controversial Duty-Hours Trial (Mostly) Backs Flexible Hours
Educational outcomes in hospitals’ intern-residency programs that set no limit on the duration of trainees’ work shifts did not differ from those in standard programs limiting shifts to 16-28 hours, the cluster-randomized iCOMPARE trial found.

Insurance Company Hurdles Burden Doctors, May Harm Patients
The scenario may sound familiar: Your doctor sends your prescription electronically to the pharmacy, and you go to pick it up. Only you can’t, because the insurance company requires “prior authorization” for that particular medication.

Severe Shortage Of Psychiatrists Exacerbated By Lack Of Federal Funding
A growing shortage of psychiatrists across the U.S. is making it harder for people who struggle with mental illness to get the care they need — and the lack of federal funding for mental health services may be to blame.

Amazon Isn’t the Only Retail Giant Trying to Remake Health Care
Amazon.com Inc. says it wants to remake health care for its workers. But its biggest rival is beating it to the punch. Walmart Inc., the largest private employer in the U.S., has been buying health care for its workers directly from providers in six different regions — bypassing insurers who usually negotiate with doctors and hospitals. The retailer is trying to find out if its formidable purchasing power can squeeze out middlemen and drive down costs in the same way that its tough bargaining has brought down prices for shoppers.

Cigna To Buy Express Scripts For $54 Billion, Ending The Era Of The Standalone Drug Middleman
Health insurer Cigna confirmed it will buy for $54 billion Express Scripts, the last major standalone pharmaceutical benefit manager. Under terms of the deal announced Thursday, the price includes $48.75 in cash and 0.2434 shares of stock of the combined company, the companies said.

Pediatric heart valve invented by St. Jude Medical OK’d by FDA
Abbott Labs’ 15-millimeter heart valve is partly manufactured in Little Canada. U.S. regulators have approved a tiny mechanical valve for young children with troubled hearts, culminating years of effort in Minnesota to produce a dependable pediatric version of a common adult-sized medical device.

Severely elevated cholesterol often goes untreated
Many patients with dangerously high cholesterol or a genetic predisposition to it don’t take statin drugs that can lower cholesterol, a U.S. study suggests.

Osler

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Osler

May 2018

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.

www.osler.org

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your examination. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

FDA Advisors Weigh COX-2 Inhibitor Safety
Should celecoxib (Celebrex) be officially declared as no riskier for the heart than other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) naproxen and ibuprofen, and do those other NSAIDs interfere with aspirin for cardiovascular prevention?

CMS rebrands Meaningful Use, reduces reporting measures
As part of its annual Medicare payment update proposal released on Tuesday, CMS plans to rename the Meaningful Use program to “Promoting Interoperability,” reflecting the Trump administration’s focus on reducing burdens and unnecessary regulations while emphasizing data sharing across providers.

In a blow for pharma, Supreme Court upholds the hated IPR patent challenge
Branded drugmakers have said “no fair” to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s inter partes review system almost since its inception seven years ago. One reason? “It’s unconstitutional,” the companies contend. The Supreme Court, in a Tuesday ruling, disagreed. In a 7-2 vote, the U.S. High Court held that the system is constitutional. It doesn’t violate Article III of the Constitution, which gives the judicial branch alone the power to decide legal arguments. Nor does it violate the Seventh Amendment, the right to a trial by jury.

New data: Americans filling far fewer opioid prescriptions
Health data firm IQVIA’s Institute for Human Data Science released a report Thursday showing an 8.9 percent average drop nationwide in the number of prescriptions for opioids filled by retail and mail-order pharmacies. All 50 states and the District of Columbia had declines of more than 5 percent. Declines topped 10 percent in 18 states, including all of New England and other states hit hard by the opioid overdose epidemic, such as West Virginia and Pennsylvania.

Commentary: Why It’s So Important to Find a Board Certified Doctor
Contrary to the views expressed by Niran Al-Agba and Meg Edison in their recent Fortune commentary, Maintenance of Certification (MOC) is important for physicians. It is an external, objective indication to patients, their families, hospitals, health systems, insurers, and other physicians that Board Certified physicians are up to date in their area of specialty medicine. With the explosion of medical knowledge and an estimated 10,000 new studies published each month, keeping current in specialty medicine is essential.

HELP ENVISION THE FUTURE OF CONTINUING CERTIFICATION
Whether you’re a physician, another professional involved in healthcare, or a patient, we value your thoughts regarding continuing certification and physician assessment.  Please take a few minutes to complete this survey by May 11.

New strategies needed to help healthcare providers gain knowledge to counsel patients on diet
A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reviews current gaps in medical nutrition education and training in the United States and summarizes reforms in undergraduate and graduate medical education to support more robust nutrition education and training efforts.

Study Finds 22 Percent Decrease in Opioid Prescriptions
A 22 percent decrease in opioid prescriptions nationally between 2013 and 2017 reflects the fact that physicians and other healthcare professionals are increasingly judicious when prescribing opioids

Late MACRA notices, outreach could put docs on hook for IT upgrades
Providers may find themselves facing thousands of dollars in unexpected electronic health record costs due to late notices from the CMS on whether they must comply with a new quality payment system outlined in MACRA.

Hospitals are germy, noisy places. Some acutely ill patients are getting treated at home instead.
Phyllis Petruzzelli spent the week before Christmas struggling to breathe. When she went to the emergency department on Dec. 26, the doctor at Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital near her home in Boston said she had pneumonia and needed hospitalization. Then the doctor proposed something that made Petruzzelli nervous. Instead of being admitted to the hospital, she could go back home and let the hospital come to her.

AMA, Mayo Clinic and others post Charter on Physician Well-Being to address burnout
More than half of U.S. physicians say they experience burnout. To address the issue, Mayo Clinic and other leading medical centers have published a “Charter on Physician Well-Being” as an intended model for medical organizations to not only minimize and manage physician burnout but also promote physician well-being.

Bill Gates donating $12 million to fund research for a universal flu vaccine
Bill Gates announced Friday that he will donate $12 million to fund research for a universal flu vaccine. Gates announced the creation of a research fund while speaking at the Massachusetts Medical Society’s annual meeting.

www.osler.org

June 2018

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.

www.osler.org

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your examination. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

Commentary: Why It’s So Important to Find a Board Certified Doctor
Contrary to the views expressed by Niran Al-Agba and Meg Edison in their recent Fortune commentary, Maintenance of Certification (MOC) is important for physicians.

AMA Invests $27M in Health2047 to Accelerate Value-Based Care
May 01, 2018 – The American Medical Association (AMA) has announced that it will help boost chronic disease reduction, productivity, and value-based care through a $27.2 million investment in Health2047, a Silicon Valley-based innovation enterprise that works closely with the AMA to catalyze healthcare change.

ACS recommends screening for colorectal cancer at age 45
The Washington Post (5/30, McGinley) reports the American Cancer Society announced on Wednesday that it is updating its guideline for screening for colorectal cancer, now calling for adults to be screened “beginning at age 45 rather than 50.”

More patients are taking home recordings of their doctor visits. But who else could listen?
Doctors across the U.S. have begun doing what once seemed unthinkable in a litigious health care environment: recording their medical conversations with patients and encouraging them to review the audio at home.

ACCME Releases New Strategic Plan
Over the past year, the ACCME Board of Directors and executive leadership, together with our entire staff, engaged in a strategic planning process. To build our vision of the future, we reviewed our trajectory, identified opportunities and challenges, and interviewed stakeholders to gain their insights and perspectives

Reporting outcomes of procedure to unblock arteries may not improve care
Public reporting of outcomes for a common procedure to clear blocked arteries was supposed to improve quality, but some doctors say it hasn’t delivered on the goal of enhancing patient care.

FDA approves Lucemyra to treat symptoms of opioid withdrawal and help patients overcome addiction
The battle against opioid addiction in the United States got a new weapon Wednesday, in the form of a pill to help patients manage symptoms of withdrawal.

First IT-savvy med students graduate under pioneering AMA program
The first graduating classes from some of the 32 medical schools to participate in the American Medical Association’s pioneering curriculum modernization initiative are now ready to take their tech savvy to hospitals and practices nationwide.

Study: Palliative Care Reduces Hospital Stay, Cost of Sickest Patients
PALLIATIVE CARE consultations that focus on improving quality of life, managing pain and defining goals at the outset of treatment for patients with serious or life-threatening illnesses can result in shorter hospital stays and lower costs, a new study concludes.

www.osler.org

July 2018

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.

www.osler.org

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your exams. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

Tell us what is important to you in CME, complete our 1 minute survey

4 ways physicians can help advance precision medicine research
The National Institute of Health”s (NIH) All of Us Research Program aims to enroll 1 million or more participants to gather data on a wide variety of health conditions. This aim is intended to gain better insights into the biological, environmental and behavioral influences on disease to enhance prevention and treatment. Key partners in helping to ensure the success of this program are physicians and other clinicians who have ongoing patient relationships.

27 Essential Tips for Leading Online Reputation Management 
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Management and Medical Websites.

Training Algorithms to Prevent Death Spirals in Hospitals
AI algorithms are combing through patient data looking for and modeling warning signs that could help doctors respond to medical emergencies and avert fatalities.

Robotic, Open Cystectomy Offer Comparable Bladder Cancer Outcomes
Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RC) for invasive bladder cancer is associated with short-term oncologic outcomes comparable to that achieved with open RC, according to a new study.

Black Heart Failure Patients Less Likely to See a Cardiologist
Among heart failure patients, black people are much less likely than white people to have their care overseen by a cardiologist, a new study finds.

Most doctors would give HIV prevention drugs to teens
 Last month U.S. regulators said a pill that helps prevent infection with HIV is safe for use by adolescents, and a study suggests most physicians would be willing to prescribe this medicine to teens.

Upcoming Live

CME on Your Terms

The Osler Institute utilized state of the art equipment to record our Live comprehensive Review Courses and bring it to you!  These Video/Audio files are stored “in the cloud” so you can stream them anywhere, anytime, as long as you have an internet connection, watch or listen to on your phone, computer &mdash your learning experience is almost like being at the live activity, but without travel costs and time away from your practice. Included with each Online review is an electronic downloadable copy of the syllabus that corresponds to the Video/Audio lectures.

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August 2018

Osler

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.www.osler.org

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your exams. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

Doctors only allow patients to speak for 11 seconds before interrupting
Most doctors don’t even let patients direct the focus of the conversation, according to a study.

Trump administration may open door to import drugs in limited cases — including after some price hikes
The Food and Drug Administration is forming a working group to consider allowing short-term importation of foreign versions of medicines facing “access dislocations.”

Citizen scientists send in over 16,000 ticks in study showing broader disease threat
After studying the submissions, researchers found 83 counties, located in 24 states, where ticks carrying disease-causing bacteria had not been documented before.

Urgent care centers often prescribe unnecessary antibiotics
(Reuters Health) – Patients with common colds and respiratory illnesses may be more likely to get antibiotics – which don’t work for these conditions – when they go to an urgent care clinic, a U.S. study suggests.

Sniffles? Cancer? Under Medicare Plan, Payments for Office Visits Would Be Same for Both
The Trump administration hopes to cut red tape by establishing a single Medicare rate for office visits. But the change could reduce payments for the sickest patients, doctors warn.

Apple’s EHR: Why Health Records on Your iPhone is Just the Beginning | THCB
Americans on average will visit a care provider about 300 times over the course of their lives. That’s hundreds of blood pressure readings, numerous diagnoses, and hundreds of entries into a patient’s medical record – and that’s potentially with dozens of different doctors.

FDA Approves First Drug Meant to Treat Smallpox
Even though the disease was eradicated in 1980

Cleaner public spaces can lessen depression and hopelessness, study finds
In areas of Philadelphia below the poverty line, residents reported a 70 percent drop in depression after public spaces were cleaned and greened.

Wearable heart monitor catches undiagnosed atrial fibrillation, JAMA study finds
A wearable heart monitor caught new cases of atrial fibrillation at three times the rate of traditional medical exams, in a study led by La Jolla’s Scripps Translational Science Institute.

A Simple Emergency Room Intervention Can Help Cut Suicide Risk
ER workers helped patients who arrived after a suicide attempt develop a tailored “safety plan” that included coping strategies of what to do and whom to call if the urge arose again.

Half of U.S. breast surgeons may advise unneeded lymph node removal
(Reuters Health) – For women with early-stage breast cancer, many surgeons would advise extensive removal of the lymph nodes under the armpits even though recent evidence shows this doesn’t improve survival or the odds of cancer recurring, a U.S. study found.

CME on Your Terms

The Osler Institute utilized state of the art equipment to record our Live comprehensive Review Courses and bring it to you!  These Video/Audio files are stored “in the cloud” so you can stream them anywhere, anytime, as long as you have an internet connection, watch or listen to on your phone, computer – your learning experience is almost like being at the live activity, but without travel costs and time away from your practice. Included with each Online review is an electronic downloadable copy of the syllabus that corresponds to the Video/Audio lectures.

www.osler.org

September 2018

Osler

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.

www.osler.org

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your exams. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

Doctors only allow patients to speak for 11 seconds before interrupting
Most doctors don’t even let patients direct the focus of the conversation, according to a study.

Trump administration may open door to import drugs in limited cases — including after some price hikes
The Food and Drug Administration is forming a working group to consider allowing short-term importation of foreign versions of medicines facing “access dislocations.”

Citizen scientists send in over 16,000 ticks in study showing broader disease threat
After studying the submissions, researchers found 83 counties, located in 24 states, where ticks carrying disease-causing bacteria had not been documented before.

Urgent care centers often prescribe unnecessary antibiotics
(Reuters Health) – Patients with common colds and respiratory illnesses may be more likely to get antibiotics – which don’t work for these conditions – when they go to an urgent care clinic, a U.S. study suggests.

Sniffles? Cancer? Under Medicare Plan, Payments for Office Visits Would Be Same for Both
The Trump administration hopes to cut red tape by establishing a single Medicare rate for office visits. But the change could reduce payments for the sickest patients, doctors warn.

Apple’s EHR: Why Health Records on Your iPhone is Just the Beginning | THCB
Americans on average will visit a care provider about 300 times over the course of their lives. That’s hundreds of blood pressure readings, numerous diagnoses, and hundreds of entries into a patient’s medical record – and that’s potentially with dozens of different doctors.

FDA Approves First Drug Meant to Treat Smallpox
Even though the disease was eradicated in 1980

Cleaner public spaces can lessen depression and hopelessness, study finds
In areas of Philadelphia below the poverty line, residents reported a 70 percent drop in depression after public spaces were cleaned and greened.

Wearable heart monitor catches undiagnosed atrial fibrillation, JAMA study finds
A wearable heart monitor caught new cases of atrial fibrillation at three times the rate of traditional medical exams, in a study led by La Jolla’s Scripps Translational Science Institute.

A Simple Emergency Room Intervention Can Help Cut Suicide Risk
ER workers helped patients who arrived after a suicide attempt develop a tailored “safety plan” that included coping strategies of what to do and whom to call if the urge arose again.

Half of U.S. breast surgeons may advise unneeded lymph node removal
(Reuters Health) – For women with early-stage breast cancer, many surgeons would advise extensive removal of the lymph nodes under the armpits even though recent evidence shows this doesn’t improve survival or the odds of cancer recurring, a U.S. study found.

CME on Your Terms

The Osler Institute utilized state of the art equipment to record our Live comprehensive Review Courses and bring it to you!  These Video/Audio files are stored “in the cloud” so you can stream them anywhere, anytime, as long as you have an internet connection, watch or listen to on your phone, computer – your learning experience is almost like being at the live activity, but without travel costs and time away from your practice. Included with each Online review is an electronic downloadable copy of the syllabus that corresponds to the Video/Audio lectures.

www.osler.org

October 2018

Osler

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.

Use Promo Code FALL2018
before 11-5-18 and get 
$50 off any of our Online Reviews
valued $400 or more

www.osler.org

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your exams. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

How Doctors Can Save Their Online Reputation and Flourish
Doctors Online reviews have become highly influential to patients for finding a doctor. It makes important for doctors to prevent their online reputation.

The Best Time to Get the Flu Shot Is Earlier Than You Think
All adults and children older than six months should get a flu vaccine by the end of October 2018, the CDC says.

Phone apps help heart patients remember meds
Smartphone apps that remind heart patients to take their pills could help them stick to prescribed regimens, an Australian study suggests.

Health data breaches on the rise
Health data breaches are on the rise, a new study shows.

Employers jump into providing care as health costs rise
Corporate America is jumping deeper into the care its workers receive beyond just giving them insurance cards and a list of doctors they can visit.

Minority doctors in US residency programs routinely face racism
Minority doctors in training routinely deal with bias, sometimes subtle, sometimes not so subtle, a new study suggests.

FDA Sets Goals for Big Data, Clinical Trials, Artificial Intelligence
The FDA is looking to accelerate innovations in clinical trials, medical product development, and artificial intelligence with cost-effective strategies and big data.

Avoidable Sepsis Infections Send Thousands Of Seniors To Gruesome Deaths
No one tracks sepsis cases closely enough to know how many times these infections turn fatal.

Why Whole-Fat Milk and Yogurt Are Healthier Than You Think
Saturated fat isn’t the whole story

Dangerous Baby Deliveries Are a Deadly Trend in the U.S. But There Are Ways to Stop It.
Deaths and complications related to childbirth are trending up – but the tide may be turning.

Nobel Prize in medicine goes to cancer immunotherapy researchers
James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo, from the United States and Japan, won the prestigious award.

CME on Your Terms


The Osler Institute utilized state of the art equipment to record our Live comprehensive Review Courses and bring them to you!  These Video/Audio files are stored “in the cloud” so you can stream them anywhere, anytime, as long as you have an internet connection, watch or listen to on your phone, computer – your learning experience is almost like being at the live activity, but without travel costs and time away from your practice. Included with each Online review is a downloadable electronic copy of the syllabus that corresponds to the Video/Audio lectures.


November 2018

Osler

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.


Use Promo Code Yearend2018
by 12-31-18 and get 
10% off any of our Online Reviews

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your exams. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

AMA launches Digital Health Implementation Playbook
The new playbook will include a step-by-step approach to implementing digital health tools, as well as best practices and other resources.

Hip and knee surgeons to use Apple Watch to monitor patients
 Up to 10,000 Americans due to have hip or knee replacements will be able to funnel basic health data directly from their Apple Watches to their surgeons under a new app being tested by orthopedics company Zimmer Biomet.

Doctors have a No. 1 suspect for this polio-like illness
Researchers have put together their own informal network to get more information about acute flaccid myelitis.

As Amazon Turns Its Gaze to Healthcare, the Industry May Be in for a Wild Ride
Our new Executive Insights, “As Amazon Turns Its Gaze to Healthcare, the Industry May Be in for a Wild Ride,” examines how far the digital retailer might take its forays into the healthcare arena.

A Sense of Alarm as Rural Hospitals Keep Closing
The potential health and economic consequences of a trend associated with states that have turned down Medicaid expansion

Early Pushing in Childbirth Won’t Hurt Mom or Baby, Study Finds

Expectant moms will want to read this.

Poll: Rural Americans Rattled By Opioid Epidemic; Many Want Government Help
A poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health finds opioid abuse a top issue for rural Americans.

The future of stroke prevention and treatment could be uneven
The long decline in stroke deaths has stalled, but doctors see hope in new interventions and strategies.

ER doctors speak out against rising incidents of physical assault
Two new surveys find that ER doctors are increasingly assaulted, both physically and verbally. They want legislation to protect them and hospitals to support them.

Patients Give Doctors High Marks For Prescribing Antibiotics For Common Sniffles
People with colds and related infections give physicians higher ratings when they give them a prescription for antibiotics. Could that lead doctors to overprescribe?

With genome sequencing, some sick infants are getting a shot at healthy lives
When babies become intensely ill, it can be difficult to know what has gone wrong. But the answer, quite often, is hidden somewhere in their genes

Doctors explore lifting barriers to living organ donation
Surgeons turned down Terra Goudge for the liver transplant that was her only shot at surviving a rare cancer. Her tumor was too advanced, they said — even though Goudge had a friend ready to donate, no matter those odds.

CME on Your Terms-


The Osler Institute utilized state of the art equipment to record our Live comprehensive Review Courses and bring them to you!  These Video/Audio files are stored “in the cloud” so you can stream them anywhere, anytime, as long as you have an internet connection, watch or listen to on your phone, computer – your learning experience is almost like being at the live activity, but without travel costs and time away from your practice. Included with each Online review is a downloadable electronic copy of the syllabus that corresponds to the Video/Audio lectures.


 

December 2018

Osler

The Osler Newsletter returns to provide you with up-to-date information to assist you in staying current with the latest news and trends in medicine and continuing medical education.

Recently Released Online Courses
Neurology 2018 Online Review
Pediatrics 2018 Online Review

Preparing for your board examination is tough. That is why The Osler Institute has designed its review courses to cut out the “fluff ” and offer you only those pearls which are guaranteed to help you ace your exams. There is never a better time than NOW to begin your preparations for your board exam.

Millions left behind as diabetes drives surge in insulin demand
A global diabetes epidemic is fuelling record demand for insulin but tens of millions will not get the injections they need unless there is a dramatic improvement in access and affordability.

One-third of US parents plan to skip flu shots for their kids
During the last US flu season, 179 children died, with hundreds hospitalized due to flu-related illnesses; 80% of the children who died were unvaccinated.

Have you scheduled surgery? Then you’d better start training.
Programs to help patients get in shape for operations can cut down on complications.

Experts chase the cause of a paralyzing childhood disease spiking this year
Doctors are desperately testing therapies for acute flaccid myelitis.

Does your doctor need to know what you buy on Amazon?
Brokers are selling your data to your doctor, and no one’s regulating it.

Physician suicide has been a problem in healthcare for decades.

Physician suicide isn’t a new issue in healthcare, but over the past few years, the industry has taken more aggressive actions to prevent it.

How the AMA Is Tackling Physician Burnout
400 physicians kill themselves every year. Here’s what the AMA is planning to do about it

Overshadowed By Opioids, Meth Is Back And Hospitalizations Surge

Hospital visits related to amphetamine use have spiked, with the biggest jumps in the West, new research shows. Experts say more attention needs be paid to the resurgence of methamphetamine.

AMA outlines initiatives aimed at fixing ‘dysfunctional’ healthcare system at interim meeting
The “dysfunctional” U.S. health system may be working to improve hospital and payer bottom lines, but it’s not working as intended for patients or the doctors that care for them, the head of the American Medical Association said.

Breast implants reveal problems in tracking device safety
More than 4,000 injury reports filed in the last half of 2017. Another 8,000 in the first six months of 2018.


Use Promo Code Winter2018
by 12-6-18 @ Midnight and Receive 
30% off any of our Online Reviews

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